US Stamps

By Jay Bigalke

Latest upright Jenny Invert pane found in Virginia; tally at 18

May 20, 2014 06:55 AM

  • David and Gail Robinson show their upright Jenny Invert stamp pane and the congratulations card that accompanied the stamp pane. Photograph by Jessica Maida Photography.

  • The upright variety of the United States $2 Jenny Invert stamp found in Virginia in May. It is the 18th example in Linn’s tally of the variety.

A new find of the intentionally created upright variety of the United States $2 Jenny Invert pane surfaced recently in Virginia.

Linn’s tally of these finds now stands at 18 panes, which leaves 82 panes still waiting to be discovered.

The most recent find was made by David and Gail Robinson of Richmond, Va.

The Robinsons have been actively purchasing large quantities of the pane of six $2 Jenny Invert stamps — a total of 3,080 — with hopes of obtaining one pane of the upright variety.

Their wishes came true when they found the upright Jenny Inverts among 14 panes purchased from stock at the Blackstone, Va., post office.

The Robinsons originally planned to purchase the equivalent of 10 percent of the calculated odds of finding one of the panes, but they later doubled that figure to 20 percent.

The odds of purchasing one of the 100 panes printed with the intentional variety is estimated by Linn’s to be 1 in 19,000.

The Robinsons told Linn’s that they spent a lot of time opening the packs and watching television, calling it “Jenny Sheet Night.”

David told Linn’s they will consign the variety pane to Robert A. Siegel Auction Galleries for the firm’s Rarities of the World sale taking place June 24-27 in New York City.

The Postal Service issued the Jenny Invert pane of six $2 stamps (Scott 4806) Sept. 22, 2013.

In October, the Postal Service revealed that just 100 panes of six showing the airplane flying right side up were randomly seeded into the entire print run of the normal stamps.

The locations of where each variety pane has been found are not available for every example, as some panes were not reported to the Postal Service, but instead were certified through philatelic grading services.

Of the panes reported to the U.S. Postal Service, three have been found in stock shipped from Stamp Fulfillment Services, two were found at post offices in New York, two in New Hampshire, and one each in Georgia, Texas, Virginia and Wisconsin.