World Stamps

By Denise McCarty

Symbolic designs on new U.N. stamps and stationery

April 16, 2015 09:02 AM

  • The designs on new United Nations definitive stamps represent the U.N. community and climate change, respectively. These stamps will be issued May 7 for use from the U.N. Postal Administration post office at U.N. headquarters in New York City.

  • The new definitive stamps for use from the U.N. Postal Administration post office at the Vienna International Center symbolize peace and human rights, respectively.


The United Nations Postal Administration will issue four definitive stamps and six pieces of postal stationery May 7.

Two of the definitive (regular-issue) stamps are for use from the UNPA post office at U.N. headquarters in New York City.

The other two stamps and the postal stationery are for use from the post office at the Vienna International Center in Vienna, Austria.

The stamps feature symbolic designs created by UNPA art director Sergio Baradat.

The U.N. community and climate change are represented on the UNPA/New York 35¢ and 40¢ stamps, respectively. The former stamp shows symbolic human heads in various colors. The latter pictures a leaf with a snowflake to indicate a cool climate, and flames for a warm climate.

Flames are shown again, this time with barbed wire, on the UNPA/Vienna €0.80 stamp symbolizing human rights.

On the €0.68 stamp, a dove represents peace.

Lowe-Martin Group of Canada printed the stamps by offset in sheets of 20.

Each stamp measures 30 millimeters by 40mm and is perforated gauge 13.3.

The quantities printed were 130,000 each of the 35¢ and 40¢ stamps; and 110,000 each of the €0.68 and €0.80 stamps.

The new postal stationery also was designed by Baradat and printed by Lowe-Martin.

The three stamped envelopes and three postal cards feature stylized views of a sculpture, buildings and flags of the Vienna International Center.

The 1.70 stamped envelope and 0.68 postal card each show different designs based on Woman Free, a 15-foot marble sculpture by Edwina Sandys.

On her website, the British sculptor says: “You can see the space from where she came. The space is shaped like a woman, and that space is as important as the solid figure.”

Women Free is pictured both in the stamp area and in the illustration on the left side of the 1.70 postal envelope.

While the sculpture is shown in the illustration on the €0.68 postal card, the stamp area shows the denomination in a circle with the U.N. emblem and “Vereinte Nationen” (the German name for United Nations) above it and the 2015 year date below.

The other postal cards also follow this format.

The illustration on the €0.80 postal card shows a view looking up between two of the center’s y-shaped buildings, while an illustration of flags of U.N. member nations appears on the left of the €1.70 postal card.

On the stamp area and illustration of the €0.68 stamped envelope, a dove can be seen flying between two y-shaped buildings.

The buildings of the complex are shown as geometric shapes on the €0.80 stamped envelope.

The quantities printed were 11,000 of each postal card; and 9,000 of each stamped envelope.

For ordering information for these definitive stamps and postal stationery, visit the UNPA website; e-mail; telephone 800-234-8672; fax 212-963-9854; or write to UNPA, Box 5900, Grand Central Station, New York, NY 10163-5900.

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