Stamp Issuing Entities Of The World



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Nabha (1885-1951)

Stamp-issuing status: inactive; Population: 340,044 (1941 estimate). A convention state of British India. Nabha's issues were used concurrently with those of India after April 1, 1950. On Jan. 1, 1951, they were replaced by Indian stamps.

Namibia (1999-)

Stamp-issuing status: active; Population: 1,648,270 (1999 estimate). Namibia was established in 1990 from South-West Africa, which had been administered by South Africa under a mandate of the League of Nations.

Nandgaon (1892-95)

Stamp-issuing status: inactive; Population: 182,380. A former feudatory state in central India. Nandgaon's issues were replaced by those of India in July 1895.

Nanumaga (1984-87)

Stamp-issuing status: inactive. One of nine small islands in the Tuvalu Islands, formerly the Ellice Island group in the Gilbert and Ellice Islands. The island chain is located east of the Solomon Islands and north of Fiji in the southeastern central Pacific Ocean. Like the other Tuvalu Islands, Nanumaga issued a flurry of stamps depicting such diverse subjects as cars, locomotives, cricket players and the British royal family in the mid-1980s.

Nanumea (1984-87)

Stamp-issuing status: inactive. One of nine small islands in the Tuvalu Islands, formerly the Ellice Island group in the Gilbert and Ellice Islands. The island chain is located east of the Solomon Islands and north of Fiji in the southeastern central Pacific Ocean. Like the other Tuvalu Islands, Nanumea issued a flurry of stamps depicting such diverse subjects as cars, locomotives, cricket players and the British royal family in the mid-1980s.

Natal (1857-1909)

Stamp-issuing status: inactive; Population: 1.2 million (1909 estimate). A former British crown colony on the southeast coast of Africa. A short-lived Boer republic, Natal came under British control in 1843. It was incorporated into the Union of South Africa in 1910.

Nauru (1916-)

Stamp-issuing status: active; Population: 10,390 (1997 estimate). An island in the west-central Pacific Ocean. Nauru was a German possession from 1888-1914 and was occupied by Australian forces during World War I. From 1920-68, Nauru was a mandate under Australia, New Zealand and Great Britain. It became an independent republic on Jan. 31, 1968. This 8-square-mile island is rich in phosphates, giving the Naureans one of the highest per capita incomes in the world.

Nawanagar (1875-95)

Stamp-issuing status: inactive; Population: 402,192. A former feudatory state in western India. Nawanagar's issues were replaced by those of India in December 1895.

Neapolitan Provinces (1861-62)

Stamp-issuing status: inactive. In October 1860, Garibaldi deposed the ruling Bourbon dynasty in the Kingdom of the Two Sicilies, and the country was annexed to Sardinia. Sardinia issued a separate series of stamps for the Neapolitan Provinces in 1861, similar to contemporary Sardinian stamps but inscribed in Neapolitan currency. This set was superseded by regular Italian issues in 1862.

Negri Sembilan (1891-)

Stamp-issuing status: active; Population: 401,742 (1960 estimate). Sultanate on the west coast of the Malay Peninsula. Placed under British protection in 1891, the sultanate was occupied by Japan 1942-45. Negri Sembilan joined the Federation of Malaya in 1948 and is now part of the Malaysian Federation.

Nejd (1925-26)

Stamp-issuing status: inactive. A region in central Arabia united by the puritanical Wahhabi Moslem movement, led by the Saud family, in the 18th century. During 1914-25, Nejd conquered the Hasa, Asir and Hejaz regions and expanded the kingdom to include most of the Arabian Peninsula. In 1925, the Kingdom of Hejaz, Nejd and Dependencies was formed, and in 1932, the kingdom was renamed Saudi Arabia.

Nepal (1881-)

Stamp-issuing status: active; Population: 22,641,061 (1997 estimate). Kingdom in the Himalaya Mountains between India and Tibet. United in 1768, Nepal remained independent during the British occupation of India and has since maintained that independence, enjoying good relations with both India and China.

Netherlands (1852-)

Stamp-issuing status: active; Population: 15,653,091 (1997). Constitutional monarchy in northwest Europe, bordering on the North Sea. A part of Charlemagne's empire, the area of the Netherlands was long ruled by outsiders: Burgundy, the Austrian Habsburgs and, by the 16th century, Spain. Political and religious repression led to a revolt in 1658, and in 1679 the seven northern provinces became independent as the Republic of the United Netherlands. During the 17th century, the Netherlands became one of the predominant naval and commercial powers, controlling a far-flung empire in the Caribbean, North and South America, Africa, India and the East Indies. Conflict with England weakened Dutch power and in 1794 the country was annexed by France. The Netherlands again became independent in 1815, and the Congress of Vienna reconstituted the state to include Belgium and Luxembourg, which later became independent themselves. The Netherlands remained neutral during World War I, successfully avoiding participation in that conflict. Its neutrality in World War II, however, was disregarded by Germany, which occupied it 1940-1945. The last major remnant of the Netherlands' once vast overseas empire was lost in 1950, when Indonesia became independent. The Dutch held West Irian until 1962, when that territory was seized by Indonesia. The Netherlands abandoned its policy of neutrality after World War II and aligned itself with the West. It is a member of NATO and of the Common Market. Although it has undergone substantial industrialization since World War II, the agricultural sector of the country's economy remains strong.

Netherlands Antilles (Curacao) (1873)

Stamp-issuing status: active; Population: 211,093 (1997). Two groups of islands in the West Indies, north of Venezuela. They were originally occupied by Spain, but have been in Dutch possession since 1634. In 1954, the colony was made an integral part of the Kingdom of the Netherlands. Aruba separated from the Netherlands Antilles and began issuing its own stamps at the beginning of 1986.

Netherlands Indies (1845-1949)

Stamp-issuing status: inactive; Population: 76 million (1949 estimate). A former Dutch colony occupying the greater portion of the East Indies. The area was originally dominated by Hindus, who were supplanted by Moslems after the 14th-15th centuries. From the early 16th century, Portugal dominated the region but was gradually supplanted by the Dutch and British. After the 17th century, the Dutch ruled most of the area. The Netherlands Indies were occupied by Japan from 1942 to 1945, during which time a great variety of occupation issues were used. Two days after Japan's surrender, Indonesian nationalists declared independence, starting the revolution that ended with Dutch withdrawal in 1949.

Netherlands New Guinea (1950-62)

Stamp-issuing status: inactive; Population: 923,440 (1973 estimate). The western half of the island of New Guinea, retained by the Dutch after Indonesian independence. After the Indonesian invasion in 1962, the United Nations assumed temporary executive authority in the area, which was transferred to Indonesia in 1963. The UNTEA (United Nations Temporary Executive Authority) overprinted the existing Dutch definitive issue in 1962, and Indonesia maintained separate issues for the territory, as West Irian, from 1963 to 1970.

Nevis (1861-1890, 1980-)

Stamp-issuing status: active; Population: 11,864 (1883 estimate). One of the Leeward Islands, southeast of Puerto Rico. From 1861 to 1890, separate issues were made for Nevis. From 1890 to 1956, stamps of the Leeward Islands were used. Issues of St. Kitts-Nevis were also used 1903-1952, replaced by St. Christopher-Nevis-Anguilla issues after 1952. Nevis again began to issue its own stamps in 1980. In 1983 it became independent, in federation with St. Kitts but still continues to maintain its own stamp issues.

New Britain (1914-15)

Stamp-issuing status: inactive; Population: 50,600. An island off the northeast coast of New Guinea, in the Pacific Ocean. Formerly part of German New Guinea, the island of Neu-Pommern was renamed New Britain, when it was occupied by Australia in 1914. During 1914/1915, German New Guinea and Marshall Islands issues, overprinted "G.R.I." and new values in sterling were used. In 1915 these issues were replaced by those of the North West Pacific Islands. After World War I, it became part of the mandated territory of New Guinea.

New Brunswick (1851-68)

Stamp-issuing status: inactive; Population: 286,000 (1871 estimate). Former British colony, now a province of Canada. New Brunswick was originally part of the French colony of New France, but it was transferred to Britain in 1713 and was incorporated into the British colony of Nova Scotia. The infusion of Tory emigres from the southern colonies during the American Revolution increased its population dramatically, and it became a separate colony in 1784. In 1867 it united with Ontario, Quebec and Nova Scotia to form the Confederation of Canada, and Canadian stamps have been used since 1868.

New Caledonia (1859-)

Stamp-issuing status: active; Population: 191,003 (1997 estimate). An island in the southwest Pacific Ocean, approximately 1,000 miles northeast of Sydney, Australia. New Caledonia was annexed by France in 1853 and administered from Tahiti until 1860, when it became a separate colony. In the years following, a number of smaller surrounding islands were added as dependencies. During World War II, New Caledonian authorities were early supporters of Free France, and, later, U.S. air bases were established on the island. In 1984 France granted internal autonomy to New Caledonia, with the possibility of eventual independence. This provoked a confrontation between native Melanesians, who now make up less than half the population, who demanded immediate independence, and European New Caledonians, about one-third of the population, who wanted continued French administration. After increasing tension and violence between the two sides, direct French authority was reestablished in 1988, with the promise of a referendum on self-government being held in 1998.

Newfoundland (1857-1949)

Stamp-issuing status: inactive; Population: 320,000 (1945 estimate). An island off the eastern coast of Canada, under British rule from the 16th century. With the mainland territory of Labrador, Newfoundland formed a British dominion until its incorporation into Canada in 1949.

New Greece (1912-13)

Stamp-issuing status: inactive. The districts of Turkey occupied by Greece in the First Balkan War. Overprinted Greek issues and one specially printed set were used in Chios, Icaria, Lemnos, Mytilene, Samos, Cavalla, Dedeagatch and other occupied Turkish territory, until they were replaced by regular Greek stamps.

New Guinea (1925-42)

Stamp-issuing status: inactive; Population: 676,500 (1948 estimate). The territory formerly constituting German New Guinea, the northeast portion of the island of New Guinea, in the South Pacific Ocean. New Guinea was occupied by Australia in 1914 and administered by Australia under a mandate from the League of Nations and, after 1947, under a mandate from the United Nations. New Guinea joined with Papua in 1949 to form the territory of Papua and New Guinea. The name later was changed to Papua New Guinea.

New Hebrides (1908-1980)

Stamp-issuing status: inactive; Population: 100,000 (1980 estimate). A group of islands in the South Pacific Ocean, north of New Caledonia. New Hebrides was declared neutral by Great Britain and France in 1878 and was administered jointly by the two nations from 1906 to 1980. On July 30, 1980, the islands became independent as the Republic of Vanuatu.

New Republic (1886-88)

Stamp-issuing status: inactive. A short-lived Boer republic in southern Africa. It was absorbed by Transvaal in 1888.

New South Wales (1850-1913)

Stamp-issuing status: inactive; Population: 1.5 million (1906 estimate). Former British crown colony in southeast Australia. In 1901, New South Wales merged into the Commonwealth of Australia.

New Zealand (1855-)

Stamp-issuing status: active; Population: 3,587,275 (1997). Two large islands and a number of smaller islands in the South Pacific Ocean. New Zealand was settled by Polynesians, beginning in the 14th century, and discovered by Europeans in 1642. It was annexed by Great Britain in 1840 and, since 1907, has been a self-governing dominion within the British Commonwealth of Nations. New Zealand has a number of dependencies in the South Pacific, among them the Cook Islands, Niue, the Tokelau Islands, and Ross Dependency in the Antarctic.

Nicaragua (1862-)

Stamp-issuing status: active; Population: 4,386,399 (1997). A republic in Central America. Nicaragua was conquered by Spain in 1522 and was attached to the Captaincy-general of Guatemala for four centuries. Briefly under Mexican rule (1822-1823), Nicaragua became independent of Spain as a member of the Central American Confederation. In 1838 Nicaragua became an independent republic. Its subsequent political history has been turbulent. The British controlled the eastern coast from the 17th century until 1893, and the United States effectively controlled the country from 1912 to 1933. During 1934-79, the Somoza family ruled Nicaragua. The Somoza regime brought order and considerable economic progress to the country. It also brought widespread corruption and ruthless political repression. In 1974, in response to the activities of the Marxist Sandinista guerrillas, the government imposed martial law. The subsequent excesses of the National Guard alienated virtually all elements of Nicaraguan society, and in August 1978, civil war erupted. The United States, which had unsuccessfully attempted to moderate the Somoza regime's policies, withdrew its support. In May 1979, a Sandinista force invaded Nicaragua and, by July, had overthrown the Somozas. The Sandinista regime maintained close ties with Cuba and the Soviet Union and supported leftist rebels in neighboring El Salvador. In 1981 anti-government rebels, the Contras, began a war to overthrow the Sandinistas. Covert U.S. support of the Contras brought an intensification of the civil war in 1986-1987, and in 1989 an accord between the two sides ended hostilities and led to a free election in 1990. Violetta Chamorro, owner of the opposition newspaper, La Prensa, led a broad anti-Sandinista coalition to victory in this election, ending more than a decade of Sandinista rule. She soon encountered opposition from both the right, which criticized the slow pace of reform, and the left, which felt that positive Sandinista reforms were being thrown out in a rush to privatization. The continuing presence of Sandinista officials throughout the government and in the military, as well as charges of corruption in the new regime created conflict within the government. In 1996 a new government was elected, committed to continuing reform, while investigating the previous regime.

Niger (1921-45, 1959-)

Stamp-issuing status: active; Population: 9,388,859 (1997). A republic in northern Africa, directly north of Nigeria. Under French control after 1890, Niger underwent several administrative incarnations, finally emerging as the Niger Territory in 1920. The Niger Territory became the Niger Colony two years later. Niger became part of French West Africa in 1904 and used French West African stamps during 1944-59. In 1958, Niger became an autonomous republic and became fully independent in 1960. It has since maintained close ties with France. Since independence, it has been ruled by a series of dictators, except for a brief period of popular-elected government from March 1993 to January 1996.

Niger Coast Protectorate (1892-1900)

Stamp-issuing status: inactive. Former British holdings in southern Nigeria. The area was absorbed into the Southern Nigeria Protectorate in 1900.

Nigeria (1914-)

Stamp-issuing status: active; Population: 107,129,469 (1997). Republic in West Africa, on the Gulf of Guinea. Nigeria was discovered by the Portuguese in the 15th century and was an early center of the African slave trade. By the end of the 18th century, British influence was tantamount in the coastal areas. Britain expanded its holdings in the area after 1861 and consolidated its holdings into the protectorates of Northern Nigeria and Southern Nigeria, which were united to form Nigeria in 1914. Nigeria became an independent federation in 1960 and a republic in 1963. Inter-tribal tensions have been strong since independence. A period of political strife during 1966-67 brought the secession of Biafra, which comprised the mineral-rich southeastern portion of the country. In the ensuing civil war, one million people died, most of them Biafran Ibos. In January 1970, Biafra surrendered and was reabsorbed into Nigeria. Nigeria has rich petroleum deposits and is a member of OPEC. The massive oil price increases of the 1970s enabled Nigeria to launch an ambitious campaign of economic development. Drastic cutbacks in oil exports during 1981-82, however, made it increasingly difficult to maintain these programs. Nigeria has been ruled by the military since 1966, except for a period of civilian rule during 1979-1983.

Niklasdorf (1938)

Stamp-issuing status: inactive. A city in the Sudetenland (Czechoslovakia). In 1938 the municipal authorities overprinted a large number of Czechoslovak stamps to commemorate the union with Germany.

Nisiros (1912-32)

Stamp-issuing status: inactive. One of the Dodecanese Islands in the eastern Aegean Sea. Nisiros was obtained from Turkey by Italy in 1912, at which time Italian stamps overprinted "Nisiros" were issued. These were superseded by the general Aegean Islands issues in 1929, although two sets overprinted "Nisiro" were released in 1930 and 1932.

Niuafo'ou (1983-)

Stamp-issuing status: active; Population: 900 (1983 estimate). A volcanic rim island of six square miles, Niuafo'ou is part of the kingdom of Tonga, located in the southern Pacific Ocean between Fiji and Samoa, 400 miles north of the Tongatupa island group. The island is better known as Tin Can Island, famed for the pickup and delivery of mail in sealed cans by swimmers and canoes to and from ships waiting offshore in the 1930s and '40s. Niuafo'ou began to issue its own stamps in mid-1983.

Niue (1902-)

Stamp-issuing status: active; Population: 1,837 (1995 estimate). Island in the South Pacific Ocean, northeast of New Zealand. The area was annexed to New Zealand in 1901. In 1974, Niue became self-governing, although New Zealand retains responsibility for defense and foreign affairs.

Niutao (1984-87)

Stamp-issuing status: inactive. One of nine small islands in the Tuvalu Islands, formerly the Ellice Island group in the Gilbert and Ellice Islands. The island chain is located east of the Solomon Islands and north of Fiji in the southeastern central Pacific Ocean. Like the other Tuvalu Islands, Niutao issued a flurry of stamps depicting such diverse subjects as cars, locomotives, cricket players and the British royal family in the mid-1980s.

Norfolk Island (1947-)

Stamp-issuing status: active; Population: 2,756 (1995). Island in the South Pacific Ocean, east of Australia, under Australian administration. The inhabitants of Norfolk Island are largely descendants of the Bounty mutineers, whose ancestors immigrated to Norfolk from the Pitcairns in 1856.

North Borneo (1883-1964)

Stamp-issuing status: inactive; Population: 460,000 (1962 estimate). Former British colony, occupying the northeast portion of the island of Borneo in the Malay Archipelago. The area of North Borneo was ruled by the sultans of Brunei from the 16th century, until the reigning sultan ceded it to American and British traders in 1872. In 1881 the British North Borneo Company was established to administer the region. North Borneo was occupied by Japan from 1942 to 1945, and after its reoccupation by Britain, it was reorganized as a colony. Renamed Sabah, British North Borneo joined with Malaya, Sarawak and Singapore to form the Malaysian Federation in 1963.

North China (1937-49)

Stamp-issuing status: inactive. The North China Liberation Area comprised Chahar, Hopeh, Shansi and Suiyan. Seven postal districts issued stamps during this period.

Northeast China (1946-51)

Stamp-issuing status: inactive. Communist administrative area comprising the provinces of Liaoning, Kirin, Jehol and Heilungkiang and, after 1948, all of Manchuria. In 1951, the issues of the regional postal administration were replaced by the general issues of the People's Republic of China.

North Epirus (1914-16, 1940-41)

Stamp-issuing status: inactive. That portion of southern Albania occupied by Greece in 1914-16 and 1940-41. During 1914-16, 32 issues of Epirus and Greek stamps overprinted "Northern Epirus" were used, and in 1940-41, some 37 overprinted Greek stamps were issued.

North German Confederation (1868)

Stamp-issuing status: inactive. A confederation of German states, formed under the leadership of Prussia in 1868, after Austria's defeat in the Austro-Prussian War. On Jan. 1, 1868, the stamps of all member nations were replaced by those of the confederation, with the area forming the North German Postal District.

North Ingermanland (1920)

Stamp-issuing status: inactive. A district in Russia, lying between the Neva River and Finland. In 1920, the area revolted, established a provisional government and sought union with Finland. Soviet troops quickly suppressed the revolt, but not before the rebels were able to issue two seven-value sets of stamps.

Northern Nigeria (1900-13)

Stamp-issuing status: inactive. Former British protectorate comprising holdings in northern Nigeria. Northern Nigeria merged with the Southern Nigeria Protectorate to form the Colony and Protectorate of Nigeria on January 4, 1914.

Northern Rhodesia (1925-64)

Stamp-issuing status: inactive; Population: 3.6 million (1963 estimate). Former British protectorate in southern Africa. Northern Rhodesia became the independent republic of Zambia in 1964.

Northwest China (1946-49)

Stamp-issuing status: inactive. The northwestern area of China proper, which after the "long march to Yenan" was the center of the communist revolution in China. It included the provinces of Kansu, Ninghsia, Tsinghai and, after 1949, Sinkiang. General Chinese issues replaced those of the region in 1949.

Northwest China (Shensi-Kansu-Ninghsia) (1935-49)

Stamp-issuing status: inactive. The center of the communist revolution in China after the "long march to Yenan." In 1949, Sinkiang was added to the region. The regional issues were replaced by the general issues of the People's Republic of China in 1949.

North West Pacific Islands (1914-24)

Stamp-issuing status: inactive; Population: 636,563. During World War I, Australian forces occupied the German possessions in New Guinea and the adjacent islands. Australian stamps overprinted "N.W. Pacific Islands" were used on Nauru from 1915 to 1916 and in former German New Guinea from 1915 to 1924.

Norway (1855-)

Stamp-issuing status: active; Population: 4,404456 (1997 estimate). A constitutional monarchy occupying the western portion of the Scandinavian Peninsula in northern Europe. A powerful kingdom in the Middle Ages, Norway later came under the domination of Denmark and, after 1814, Sweden. In 1905, Norway became completely independent. The country was occupied by Germany from 1940 to 1945. Following World War II, Norway abandoned its traditional neutrality and joined NATO. The country's abundant hydroelectric resources have produced an ongoing economic boom that has given Norway one of the highest standards of living in the world.

Nossi-Be (1889-98)

Stamp-issuing status: inactive: Population: 9,000 (1900 estimate). An island in the Indian Ocean, lying off the northwestern coast of Madagascar. Nossi Be was a French protectorate until 1898, when it was attached to the colony of Madagascar.

Nova Scotia (1851-1868)

Stamp-issuing status: inactive; Population: 387,000 (1871 estimate). Former British colony in east Canada. Settled by the French in 1607 and British in 1613, the area was disputed, until France ceded its claims to Britain in 1713. Prince Edward Island was separated from Nova Scotia in 1769, New Brunswick in 1784. Nova Scotia joined with Ontario, Quebec and New Brunswick to form the Canadian Confederation in 1867, and Canadian stamps have been used since 1868.

Nuggen (Noo) (1941)

Stamp-issuing status: inactive. A city in Estonia. During July-Aug. 13, 1941, five Russian stamps were surcharged in red, in green and in black for use in the city by the German military commander.

Nui (1984-87)

Stamp-issuing status: inactive. One of nine small islands in the Tuvalu Islands, formerly the Ellice Island group in the Gilbert and Ellice Islands. The island chain is located east of the Solomon Islands and north of Fiji in the southeastern central Pacific Ocean. Like the other Tuvalu Islands, Nui issued a flurry of stamps depicting such diverse subjects as cars, locomotives, cricket players and the British royal family in the mid-1980s.

Nukufetau (1984-87)

Stamp-issuing status: inactive. One of nine small islands in the Tuvalu Islands, formerly the Ellice Island group in the Gilbert and Ellice Islands. The island chain is located east of the Solomon Islands and north of Fiji in the southeastern central Pacific Ocean. Like the other Tuvalu Islands, Nukufetau issued a flurry of stamps depicting such diverse subjects as cars, locomotives, cricket players and the British royal family in the mid-1980s.

Nukulaelae (1984-87)

Stamp-issuing status: inactive. One of nine small islands in the Tuvalu Islands, formerly the Ellice Island group in the Gilbert and Ellice Islands. The island chain is located east of the Solomon Islands and north of Fiji in the southeastern central Pacific Ocean. Like the other Tuvalu Islands, Nukulaelae issued a flurry of stamps depicting such diverse subjects as cars, locomotives, cricket players and the British royal family in the mid-1980s.

Nyasaland Protectorate (1907-54, 1963-64)

Stamp-issuing status: inactive; Population: 3 million (1964 estimate). Former British protectorate in south-central Africa. Established as British Central Africa in 1890, the name Nyasaland Protectorate was adopted in 1907. During 1953-63, it was a member of the Federation of Rhodesia and Nyasaland. Nyasaland became independent in 1964, changing its name to Malawi.

Nyassa (1897-1929)

Stamp-issuing status: inactive; Population: 3 million (1923 estimate). A district in northwestern Mozambique. Nyassa was administered by the private Nyassa Co. until 1929, when the company's rights reverted to Portugal.






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