US Stamps

Genuine rarity or dangerous forgery? Inside Linn’s

Feb 1, 2019, 10 AM
Features of this greeting card envelope, franked with a United States 3¢ Thomas Jefferson booklet stamp, machine-canceled U.S.S. TENNESSEE 9– AM DEC 7 1941, examined and struck with a PASSED BY NAVAL CENSOR mark in blue ink, are analyzed in this report. If genuine, as Ken Lawrence believes, it is an important keepsake to remind present and future generations of that fateful date.

By Molly Goad

The Feb. 18 monthly issue of Linn’s Stamp News just landed on the presses and goes in the mail to subscribers Tuesday, Feb. 5. And if you subscribe to Linn’s digital edition, you’re at the head of the line with early access Saturday, Feb. 2. Here are three stories you'll want to check out.

Genuine rarity or dangerous forgery?

In this comprehensive 19-page Spotlight on Philately feature, author Ken Lawrence presents evidence that a genuine Dec. 7, 1941, cover from the battleship USS Tennessee at Pearl Harbor has been wrongly condemned as a fake.

Postal reform in India

Among India’s 1854 stamps, the 4-anna red and blue bicolored stamp is considered the “champion” of Indian classic stamp issues. Unveiling Classic Stamps columnist Sergio Sismondo has the details in this extension of his Dec. 17, 2018 column titled “India’s fascinating Scinde Dawks.”

Advertising covers tell stories of French businesses seeking customers

Postal history can reveal a lot more than just how mail was handled. Illustrated covers tell of past products, personalities and technologies. Larry Rosenblum shares examples in Philately of France.

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