US Stamps

U.S. 1913 parcel post stamps enjoy popularity

Feb 24, 2021, 9 AM
The United States $1 Fruit Growing parcel post stamp showing a Florida orange grove (Scott Q12) is in demand and a good buy in very fine grade and unused, hinged condition or mint, never-hinged condition at 80 percent to 90 percent of Scott catalog values.

Stamp Market Tips by Henry Gitner and Rick Miller

The market for U.S. back-of-the-book stamps has benefited from the general recent increase in collecting U.S. stamps. Parcel post stamps are among the most popular at the moment.

An Act of Congress of Aug. 24, 1912, created fourth-class rates for parcel post. A set of 12 stamps denominated from 1¢ to $1 was issued Jan. 1, 1913, for payment of postage for parcel post mail.

Distribution of the stamps began Nov. 27, 1912, and some stamps were issued and used early.

When first issued, these stamps were only valid for parcel post and regular postage stamps were not authorized to pay postage for parcel post mail. On June 26, 1913, the rule was changed to allow both types of stamps for either type of mail.

Look for the high-denomination stamp from the set, the $1 Fruit Growing parcel post stamp showing a Florida orange grove (Scott Q12).

The Scott Specialized Catalogue of United States Stamps and Covers values the stamp at $250 in unused, hinged condition and $600 in mint, never-hinged condition. The stamp is a good buy in very fine grade at 80 percent to 90 percent of Scott catalog value.

The market abounds with examples that have been reperforated and/or regummed. A certificate from one of the recognized expertizing services is absolutely essential when buying a stamp offered as being in mint, never-hinged condition.

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