World Stamps

Look for two 1903 sets from the Colombian state of Boyaca

Nov 25, 2019, 12 PM
Colombian states stamps are hard to find and often sell for more than the 2020 Scott Classic Specialized Catalogue of Stamps and Covers 1840-1940 value.

Stamp Market Tips by Henry Gitner and Rick Miller

Latin American stamps are popular with many collectors, and the market for stamps from most South American countries is healthy and active. One of the better countries is Colombia, with some demand for stamps of almost all periods.

In 1861 the Grenadine Confederation was succeeded by the United States of Colombia. This federation of nine states, comprising the present-day nations of Colombia and Panama, was headed by a centralized presidency, but the states retained a great deal of autonomy in finance and government.

Six of the nine states issued postage stamps: Antioquia, Bolivar, Boyaca, Cundinamarca, Santander and Tolima. The constitution of Aug. 4, 1886, changed the name of the country to the Republic of Colombia and the status of the states to departments. The departments retained some autonomy, and some continued to issue stamps until 1904.

Colombian states stamps are popular with Colombian and classic stamp collectors. Many of these stamps have minimal catalog value, but they are not that easy to find. Very fine examples often sell for more than catalog value.

Two good sets to look for were issued by the state of Boyaca in 1903 (Colombia - Boyaca Scott 4-9 and 10-17). Both sets have the same designs, but the stamps in the first set are imperforate, while those in the second set are perforated gauge 12.

The 2020 Scott Classic Specialized Catalogue of Stamps and Covers 1840-1940 values the first set at $12.80 in unused hinged condition and in used condition, and the second set at $32.15 in unused hinged condition and in used condition. Both sets are a great buy in fine-very fine grade at full Scott catalog value. Sets in true very fine grade bring a nice premium.

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